PAST EXHIBITION

    Chandelier

    MATHIEU BRIAND
    ET IN LIBERTALIA EGO, VOL. II

    2 SEPTEMBER 2015 – 16 MAY 2016

    'A giant fish led us there, a storm whirled us to this isle. In the wilderness of space, we found …'
    - Jeanette Winterson

    When French artist Mathieu Briand swam from one small island to an even smaller island off Madagascar in 2008, he was on a quest: to find a safe haven for contemporary art, where he could create art for art's sake, far away from the strictures and bustle of the artworld proper. It was to be a creative paradise - in which Briand would eventually gather likeminded artists, dancers and writers - modeled on the fabled pirate's utopia Libertalia, drawn from an eighteenth-century book by Captain Charles Johnson and rumoured to lie off the Madagascan coast.

    But Briand soon discovered he was not alone. The island was home to a traditional Malagasy family who believed in animal sacrifice and the worship of a sacred tree. The family were puzzled by the artwork of Briand and his friends, convinced they were dealing in black magic. The weight of colonial history looms large, but the artist's quest continues: Briand travels to the island still, as his utopic project and relationship with the island family deepens and evolves.

    And now to another island in colder waters: Briand will bring the latest iteration of his project to Mona, itself located on an almost-island still tethered to the Apple Isle, cast off from mainland Australia and mired in its own dark history of colonialism.

    At Mona, Briand introduces Pitcairn Island into the fold, to continue his exploration of the island as a creative laboratory of history and culture.

    The exhibition at Mona will draw out Briand's research and experiences in a way that challenges our perception of reality. During Et In Libertalia Ego, Vol. II, Briand will also stage a three-day exhibition in his studio on the Madagascan island and will publish an artist's book narrating the story of the project as it continues to unfold. For Briand, it seems, it's islands all the way down.

    This project has been supported by La Maison Rouge, Paris
    www.lamaisonrouge.org

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Gilbert & George - What's On Listing

    GILBERT & GEORGE
    THE ART EXHIBITION

    28 NOVEMBER 2015 – 28 MARCH 2016

    The artists' first Australasian retrospective showcased ninety-seven pictures from 1970 to 2014, obliging a view of the modern world through the lens of their distinctive compositions.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Nest - Katthy Cavaliere V2

    KATTHY CAVALIERE: LOVED  

    28 NOVEMBER 2015 – 28 MARCH 2016

    Curated by Daniel Mudie Cunningham

    '"Katthy" was a spelling mistake at birth. I had a traumatic birth - forced out by a doctor who was in a hurry to go shopping and buy shoes. I often get stuck in thoughts or spaces which I feel like I can't get out of.'
    -Katthy Cavaliere

    Katthy Cavaliere (1972 - 2012) had a lifelong project of packing, storing and transporting the wreckage of her personal possessions and transforming it into art. Exorcising the past as a waking dream, but never able to let go of anything, Katthy made her private life public via an art practice that focused on the stuff of everyday life, such as chairs, clothes, toys, bags and boxes. 

    Featuring photographs, video and installations, Katthy Cavaliere: Loved traced thirteen years of key works by an artist who, having trained as a photographer, found form across many disciplines. Just as she embraced the typo in her birth name, Katthy considered the mistakes, accidents and emptiness of existence, 'reality's black tunnel of nothingness', as imaginary spaces capable of producing art.

    The exhibition will show at Carriageworks from 5 August - 11 September, 2016.

    Nest
    2010
    Katthy Cavaliere
    Performance production still
    Estate of the artist

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Marina Abramovic Exhibition Hero

    MARINA ABRAMOVIĆ
    PRIVATE ARCHAEOLOGY

    JUNE 13 – OCTOBER 5, 2015

    Christ died on the Cross for our sins. So the New Testament tells us. Hopefully I'll do something worthy of his sacrifice one day. I've got real potential when it comes to sin.


    Marina Abramović seems to operate for all of us. Her sins, her excesses, her minimalist, egocentric actions define the boundaries of what it is to be human.

    I would do the stuff that she does if I had the balls. And the brains. And the desperation to understand.

    I'd rather be represented by a sinner than a saint.

    -David Walsh

    This exhibition was curated by Nicole Durling and Olivier Varenne.

    Marina Abramović in Australia: two unique projects presented by MONA and Kaldor Public Art Projects.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    BIM

    BIENNALE OF MOVING IMAGES, HOBART 2015

    JANUARY 17 – JULY 6, 2015

    Eighteen new works representing the next generation of emerging video artists, as selected by world-renowned artistic directors Andrea Bellini, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Yann Chateigné. Fresh from Geneva, the Biennale stopped by Mona on a round-the-world tour that continues on to Shanghai, Paris and Venice later this year.

    Artists: Gabriel Abrantes, Ed Atkins, Mark Boulos, Alexander Carver & Daniel Schmidt, Benjamin Crotty, Basil Da Cunha, Tom Huett, Pauline Julier, Marie Kølbæk Iversen, Donna Kukama, Arvo Leo, Felix Melia, Heather Phillipson, Li Ran, James Richards, Jeremy Shaw, Carlo Gabriele, Tribbioli & Federico Lodoli, Hannah Weinberger

    Artworks originally commissioned and produced by the Centre d'Art Contemporain Genève, curated by Andrea Bellini with Hans Ulrich Obrist and Yann Chateigné and Olivier Varenne (Mona).

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Barney 1

    MATTHEW BARNEY
    RIVER OF FUNDAMENT  

    NOVEMBER 22, 2014 - APRIL 13, 2015

    Crude thoughts and fierce forces are my state.
    - Norman Mailer, Ancient Evenings  (1983)

    Matthew Barney's River of Fundament is a sprawling, ambitious interpretation of Norman Mailer's chequered masterpiece, Ancient Evenings. It comprises a symphonic film by Barney and Jonathan Bepler, an exhibition, and a selection of Egyptian antiquities from Mona's own collection. Read more here.

    This exhibition was curated by the artist with David Walsh, Nicole Durling and Olivier Varenne.
    Matthew Barney: River of Fundament was originally curated by Okwui Enwezor and exhibited at Haus der Kunst, Munich.
    Generously supported by the Laurenz Foundation, Schaulager, Basel; Gladstone Gallery, New York; Regen Projects, Los Angeles, and Sadie Coles HQ, London.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    STARS IN DISGUISE

    STARS IN DISGUISE BY RAHNI ALLAN
    LIBRARY GALLERY, MONA 

    11 DECEMBER 2014 - 12 JANUARY 2015

    Stars in Disguise is an immersive multi-media installation by Tasmanian artist and 2013 MONA Scholarship recipient, Rahni Allan, comprising visual illusions and interactive fibre-optics. We are the stuff of stars and Stars in Disguise offers each of us the chance to wonder at our solar connections.

    Allan's work uses fibre-optic cables attached to an external telescope that tracks the sun - our closest star - and feeds into the gallery space. The optics, arranged to mimic the night sky, are suspended above a reflective pool. People are invited to 'touch the stars', composed of virtual photons that have travelled some 200,000 years to reach the earth's surface, and a mere eight minutes to reach our fingertips. Adjacent to the star-lit pools is a mirror suspended above a platform, upon which visitors are invited to lay down and view images of star clusters produced by Hubble scientists amidst everyday material collages made by the artist in her studio.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    The-Red-Queen

    THE RED QUEEN

    18 JUNE 2013 - 8 SEPTEMBER 2014

    The Red Queen is a character from Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking-Glass. She's a sinister mixture of power and futility: even as she doles out orders willy-nilly, she seems to lock herself in a weird and lonely prison of words:

    'What's the French for fiddle-de-dee?'
    
'Fiddle-de-dee's not English,' Alice replied gravely.

    'Who ever said it was?' said the Red Queen.


    Alice thought she saw a way out of the difficulty this time. 'If you'll tell me what language "fiddle-de-dee" is, I'll tell you the French for it!' she exclaimed triumphantly.

    But the Red Queen drew herself up rather stiffly, and said 'Queens never make bargains.'


    More curiously, the Queen is driven, by abstract forces, to run in order to keep pace with the world around her. However fast she goes, she never seems 'to pass anything', and 'the trees and the other things around' her don't change their place at all. '"[Do] all the things move along with us?" wonders Alice.

    We're co-opting the Queen for our own purposes in this exhibition at Mona. But she's been corrupted already of course, by scientists working in the field of evolutionary biology. That notion - that one might run and run, with neither goal nor end - is one key to twenty-first century thinking about how species evolve, in brutal harmony, with their environment. We're not used to thinking of it like that. We like to imagine we are struggling ever-forward to some end-point - personal, collective, universal - that will atone for our suffering and make our joys mean something. Evolution has no such agenda, nothing in mind for us, as it molds us to the shape of our environment. When you look at it like this, and surrender the assumption of progress, all of a sudden our words and deeds - like the Red Queen's - mean nothing and everything at once; rich and strange nonsense indeed.

    How does art fit into this? It is a behaviour, a practice, that congeals humanity like the fat in a fry-pan; it clarifies and distills, evaporates the excess, until we can see (just for a moment) into the base of ourselves. And perhaps -- let us phrase it as a question. Is human-ness nothing but a set of such behaviours?

    The answer, we hope and aim, will remain elusive; there will be no lessons learnt or taught, only contagious inquiry into the messy machinery of human nature.

    Alice looked round her in great surprise. 'Why, I do believe we've been under this tree the whole time! Everything's just as it was!'

    'Of course it is,' said the Queen, 'what would you have it?'

    PAST EXHIBITION

    HUBERT DUPRAT
    B1 GALLERIES, MONA 

    7 DECEMBER 2013 - 28 JULY 2014

    His first solo exhibition in Australia, French artist Hubert Duprat continued his unending investigation of the world. The selection of work featured a huge array of materials and techniques-including natural magnets, crystals sculpted by microscopic atomic arrangement, Neolithic flint-knapping techniques and endemic caddisfly larvae. Curiosity trumps 'out of the blue' spontaneity as Duprat asks precise questions of nature and knowledge, of originality and art itself.

    The experiments of Duprat - a self-taught and self-professed amateur - have us intrigued. Duprat's approach to making art resists neat compartmentalisation, with his work plumbing the ripe borderlands between artistry and science. You could expect (among other things, mind you) an evocation of prehistoric symbolism and technical adaptation, as artistic expression meets rationality head-on.

    Curated by Olivier Varenne, Jane Clark and Nicole Durling.

    Volos, 2013
    Polished axe, fresh clay
    Courtesy of Art : Concept

    ADAGP, photograph Rebecca Fanuele 

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Roger Ballen

    ROGER BALLEN
    LIBRARY GALLERY, MONA 

    7 DECEMBER 2013 - 28 JULY 2014

    Roger Ballen is what you'd call a 'wound opener'. Working with black and white film, Ballen's photography sheds light on the darker side of the human self - a scab that most of us would perhaps rather leave untouched. He describes his work as fundamentally psychological and existential; for him, making art is an exercise in defining himself. His photography also incorporates drawings, sculptures, and a photographic drawing technique developed by Ballen himself.

    Ballen was at MONA to exhibit work from his Asylum and Apparitions series.

    Curated by Olivier Varenne and Nicole Durling.

    Banner, 2009
    Roger Ballen
    Archival pigment print
    Image courtesy of the artist

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Beam-in-Thine-Own-Eye

    I LOOK TO YOU AND I SEE NOTHING
    FORMERLY BEAM IN THINE OWN EYE
    SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION

    16 NOVEMBER 2013 - 16 FEBRUARY 2014

    Premiering during our very first Dark Mofo, Beam In Thine Own Eye took up a mind-bending residence in the icy confines of MAC1 on the Hobart waterfront. The exhibition travelled to Sharjah, United Arab Emirates.

    Of the exhibition, David Walsh writes,
    'Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed', is Jesus' absurdist counterpoint to Thomas' philosophy, which is usually distilled to 'Seeing is believing'. Here we construct reality by guessing, or by building a series of portraits.

    In fact, we manufacture our view of reality by verifying, and perhaps refuting, hypotheses through the process of testing them against our observations. We decide what we believe by reference to our experiences, construct theories that make forecasts and test them against what actually happens. I suspect that a cup of tea will cool more slowly if I add milk sooner than later, but I could be wrong. Something like believing until we see otherwise, which is what Thomas actually did. That's why he was Thomas the Doubter. And that's why I am David the Doubter.

    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye? -Matthew 7:3

    Here, the 'beam that is in thine own eye' is meant to refer to the faults in ourselves, but it beautifully conjures the notion of our reality shining from within. The conversation we have with art is a conversation with ourselves. And in this exhibition, Beam In Thine Own Eye, we let the mind's eye shine.
    -DW

    Curated by Olivier Varenne and Nicole Durling

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Theatre of the World Paris

    THEATRE OF THE WORLD
    LA MAISON ROUGE, PARIS (FRANCE) 

    19 OCTOBER 2013 - 12 JANUARY 2014

    Theatre of the World engages, and rejects, the widely held notion that ancient and contemporary works of art are inherently different, and that we must burden the past with the weight of history. Following its world premiere at Mona in June 2012, the exhibition took up residence at La Maison Rouge in Paris (France).

    The exhibition had, as its backbone, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery collection of Pacific barkcloths and Mona's collection of everything. Other sources were tapped when required to enhance the perceptual interplay, or on whim.

    Theatre of the World is a kaleidoscope: here the viewer sees the object, and that is enough. This notion harkens back to the Renaissance view that art and knowledge are inextricably intertwined. This art is visual poetry, a conveyor of dreams, a mobilizer of imagination, and a conduit for emotion. When we find beauty sometimes we need look no further.

    Curated by Jean-Hubert Martin
    A MONA & Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery collaboration. 

    PAST EXHIBITION

    A Rat's Nest

    'A RAT'S NEST' BY PIP STAFFORD
    MONA LIBRARY GALLERY

    27 SEPTEMBER - 25 NOVEMBER 2013

    'A Rat's Nest' was an experiment in sound and form, chaos and control, warp and weft. Over the course of the exhibition, the installation unfolded before us, illuminating the volatile ecology that we inhabit. It consisted of radios, amplifiers, antennae and crystals grown in response to the gallery space, and also featureed performance - the artist used crystal radios to generate delicate sounds and explore the frequencies of rocks.

    Mona Scholarship 2012 recipient Pip Stafford is a media artist based in Hobart, Tasmania. Her work explores the materiality of networks, systems, communication and ritual, and can be seen in the form of installation, sound, performance, video and more.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Ten-Years-of-Tears-Todd-McMillan-1

    TODD MCMILLAN
    TEN YEARS OF TEARS
    MONA LIBRARY

    JUNE 19 TO SEPTEMBER 16, 2013

    I like to think that a lot of my work sits between the sadness of leaving and the fear of return.

    Works sampled from ten years of Australian artist Todd McMillan's absurd and melancholic video-art practice, on show in Roy Grounds' modernist masterpiece, The Round House - which now serves as the Mona library. Also on display is a collection of books, selected by the artist to show us the literary influences that have shaped his work.

    I create my artwork hoping to mimic the condition of sitting down and reading a novel.

    -Todd McMillan

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Beam-in-Thine-Own-Eye

    BEAM IN THINE OWN EYE

    MAC1, JUNE 14 - JULY 28, 2013

    'Blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed', is Jesus' absurdist counterpoint to Thomas' philosophy, which is usually distilled to 'Seeing is believing'. Here we construct reality by guessing, or by building a series of portraits.

    In fact, we manufacture our view of reality by verifying, and perhaps refuting, hypotheses through the process of testing them against our observations. We decide what we believe by reference to our experiences, construct theories that make forecasts and test them against what actually happens. I suspect that a cup of tea will cool more slowly if I add milk sooner than later, but I could be wrong. Something like believing until we see otherwise, which is what Thomas actually did. That's why he was Thomas the Doubter. And that's why I am David the Doubter.

    And why beholdest thou the mote that is in thy brother's eye, but considerest not the beam that is in thine own eye?
    -Matthew 7:3

    Here, the 'beam that is in thine own eye' is meant to refer to the faults in ourselves, but it beautifully conjures the notion of our reality shining from within. The conversation we have with art is a conversation with ourselves. And in this Dark Mofo exhibition, Beam In Thine Own Eye, we let the mind's eye shine.

    -David Walsh

    Warning: If you have any history of photosensitive epilepsy, you are strongly advised not to enter the exhibition. Due to the immersive nature of the installation, there is a danger of motion sickness, trance-like states and blackouts; and epileptic seizures may be experienced in varying degrees. In addition, people suffering from asthma or general breathing problems, migraine and headaches, eye and ear diseases, or claustrophobia, are advised not to enter. Pregnant women, children and those below the age of 18 may not attend ZEE.

    There is limited capacity in each installation.

    Beam in Thine Own Eye is part of the Dark Mofo festival.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    spectra [tasmania] 2013

    SPECTRA [TASMANIA] 2013
    RYOJI IKEDA  

    JUNE 14-23, 2013

    A tower of pure, white light, reaching fifteen kilometres into the Hobart sky above the Domain. At the base of the tower, forty-nine custom- made Xenon searchlights are set into the ground in a seven-by-seven grid; combined, they point a fleshless finger at our town straight down, it seems, from some sort of imagined, omniscient seat in the sky. Sine waves - the purest kind of sound wave - form invisible sonic patterns at the base; your movement alters their composition in a way that only you can specify.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Theatre_Of_The_World_Image_1

    THEATRE OF THE WORLD

    JUNE 23 2012-APRIL 8 2013

    Theatre of the World engages, and rejects, the widely held notion that ancient and contemporary works of art are inherently different, and that we must burden the past with the weight of history.
     
    Theatre of the World is a kaleidoscope: here the viewer sees the object, and that is enough. This notion harkens back to the Renaissance view that art and knowledge are inextricably intertwined. This art is visual poetry.
     
    Theatre of the World has, as its backbone, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery collection of Pacific barkcloths and Mona's collection of everything. Other sources are tapped when required to enhance the perceptual interplay, or on whim.
     
    In the theatre of the world art is a conveyor of dreams, a mobilizer of imagination, and a conduit for emotion. When we find beauty sometimes we need look no further.

    Curated by Jean-Hubert Martin.
    A MONA and TMAG (Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery) collaboration.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Yannick_Demmerle_1

    YANNICK DEMMERLE

    SEPTEMBER 19, 2012-MARCH 11, 2013

    Yeah, I'm young, fit, but also handsome, brilliant and virile. Do we really need to be nice?

                                    - Yannick Demmerle

    Yannick has been resident in our library since January. He's arrested us with his energy and intensity. There's no self-effacing irony for Yannick; no false artistic modesty: when he makes art, he means it.

    It takes blowing off everything for your artwork... the family, money, security, happiness, friends. Are you ready to do that for yours, darling?

                                    - Yannick Demmerle

    During his time at Mona he's made a series of large works on paper, a new direction in his practice about which he is tremendously excited.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    WIM_DELVOYE

    WIM DELVOYE

    DECEMBER 10, 2011 - APRIL 9, 2012

    Wim Delvoye is a Belgian conceptual artist. There is heated debate among us at Mona about the ethical integrity of his work, and pronunciation of his name. We love him, though, and we were really excited to have so many works of his - more than one hundred, in fact - here in Tassie, many for the first time out of Europe (it's just north of the mainland). Sorry, but you've missed it now. However, there are still some of Wim's works in Monanism.

    PAST EXHIBITION

    Experimenta_Utopia

    EXPERIMENTA UTOPIA

    AUGUST 5, 2011 - OCTOBER 3, 2011

          You must follow me carefully. I shall have to controvert one or two ideas that are almost universally accepted...

    New media art by Australian and international artists. Cohered by the question: what now? Where are we headed?

          ... a peculiar change crept over the appearance of things...

    Interactive, innovative exhibition that critiques, exploits and celebrates new art, new media, new ways of looking at our world.

          So with a kind of madness growing upon me, I flung myself into futurity.

          - HG Wells, The Time Machine 1895


    Image
    Nanotopia, 2006 (video still)
    Michael Burton

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